Quick Question

Background: I received an email from someone I do not know who read Create Your Own DIY Planner. She asked if I would be creating a planner for creatives and selling it.

What You Need to Know: The Artist’s Way

Creative Commons via catchingcourage.com

I don’t know about you, but this year is zooming by. Tomorrow is August.

August.

That’s not exactly breaking news, but here’s something that is.

I am hosting an Artist’s Way Circle in my Facebook group, Keeping It Creative, Kinda… (KICK). It starts tomorrow. August 1.

Later today, I will be posting a short video about The Artist’s Way. I will tell you about the key concepts of it, the importance of Morning Pages and Artist Dates, the contract with yourself, and doing the assignments.

If you are interested in following along with us and doing The Artist’s Way for yourself, I’d be glad to have you. Feel free to join the group. We will be doing more creative challenges as well. It’s not just an Artist’s Way group. It’s a creativity group where, I hope, you will learn how to tap into and recognize your creativity.

 

Picture Day

I’ve been struggling with what to post. Do I share another experience? A video? A look into my life? What?

How about a photo?

OK. I can do a photo. Here you go.

This was taken at Robber’s Cave State Park in Wilburton, Oklahoma. It’s the stairs at the dam on Lake Carlton. With water rushing over the dam and the stairs,I liked how it looked. You can see how the water landed on the stairs and started cascading down them, too.

Stairs at Lake Carlton dam at Robber’s Cave State Park

Remember Your Audience 

This is equally important in person and while writing. Actually, it’s probably more important. 

Last week, I spent some time at Robber’s Cave State Park in Wilburton, Oklahoma. It was my mom, sister-in-law, nephew, one of my nieces, and three cousins. 

That night at the campfire, my nephew wanted everyone to tell ghost stories. Now, that day also happened to be the anniversary of a very traumatic event for two of the cousins who were with us.

I knew that. I forgot that. When my turn came to tell a story, I started telling one I had heard during the ghost tour at the Crescent Hotel in Eureka Springs about a little girl.

That past event never crossed my mind. I started telling the story. One cousin said, “No ghost stories about children, please.”

That had the effect of a bucket of cold water. I could not believe I didn’t think about that. I still can’t. I felt like an inconsiderate dolt.

Learn from my mistake. Always, always keep your audience in mind, whether in writing or oral storytelling.